Determination of Surface Area by Surfactant Adsorption in Aqueous Suspension—I. Dodecylamine Hydrochloride*

G. William Kalb and R. Bruce Curry
Department of Mineralogy, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
Department of Agricultural Engineering, Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, Ohio
The Ohio State University, Wooster, Ohio
* Approved as Journal Article No. 119-68 of the Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, Ohio. The study reported here was supported in part by a research grant (NSF-GK-119) from the National Science Foundation.
Formerly graduate assistant, Department of Agricultural Engineering Ohio Agricultural Research and Development Center, Wooster, Ohio.

Abstract: Conductometric titrations of clay suspensions with surfactant solutions offer a rapid method of surface area determination of clay particles suspended in aqueous media. A cationic surfactant, dodecylamine hydrochloride, was used in this investigation. This surfactant was adsorbed by electrostatic bonding at cation exchange sites and by van der Waals forces. A monomolecular or bimolecular layer of the surfactant coats the particle and the completion of the layer is determined from a change in slope of the conductometric titration curve due to the formation of micelles. Good agreement between this method and BET determined values were obtained for kaolinite. The bentonite suspensions had a strong tendency to flocculate after the initial stage of adsorption causing the results to vary considerably. This method of surface area measurement of clay particles offers many advantages over the present techniques: (1) a dry particle is not required; (2) the equipment is inexpensive and available in many laboratories; (3) the method is rapid; (4) vacuum and high temperature are not required, and (5) the method measures the internal as well as external surface area.

Clays and Clay Minerals; July 1969 v. 17; no. 2; p. 47-57; DOI: 10.1346/CCMN.1969.0170202
© 1969, The Clay Minerals Society
Clay Minerals Society (www.clays.org)